Do We Understand

America in 2019?

Who are we and where do we go from here? We use past works of literature to guide us in answering that questions.

Sunday, February 10, 2019, 3:59PM

W

                            e millennials have grown up with the storylines surrounding the

                            dot-com bubble, 9/11, the introduction of the smartphone and the

                            collapse of the financial sector. Then in 2008, this country took a

                            massive leap forward with the election of Barack Obama. Republicans were nowhere to be found, setting the narrative that the party was damaged beyond repair. In 2009, the Tea Party came into formation, planting the seeds for what we now realize was the rebirth of the latest populism movement.

Then in April of 2015, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announced her second try at the White House. A few months later, long shot Donald Trump descended upon an escalator and announced his run for the Presidency. The stock market, specifically the S&P 500, was up almost 150% from the final day of the preceding administration. Our wars in the Middle East were deescalating. Unemployment was at record lows. The 2016 election was lined up for America’s first Madam President but the mainstream narrative was embarrassingly wrong.

On November 4th, 2016, a reality television show host and business man painted the electoral college red. The major institutions of this country were not in tune with the political dialect during this period of history and produced a grossly misguided narrative.

 

So, how do we reconcile the condition of today's politics with what we know about who we are; as a country and as a people?

 

Here’s what we discovered. There’s no question; the current political ideology of America is divided now more than ever. But history can help us to uncover the larger questions at play and new, innpvative voices with fresh ideas can begin solving those questions.

 

Alongside Grizly Sports, Grizly Business and Grizzly Culture, we hope that Grizly Politics is viewed as that table at your favorite bar. Where in which, amongst friendly and thought-provokingn exhcnages with a copule hard drinks to boot, we discuss those resolutions and answers and draw correlations with what's going on in our country in a greater understanding to combine history with current trends. Along with exploring this lens of history, we also plan to provide commentary highlighting the current political climate for each of the fifty states to and how they will play out in the 2020 Presidential Election. 

We're on a drive over the next two years; a drive to better understand the heart and soul of our country. We hope you join us on this journey.

 bubble, 9/11, the introduction of the smartphone and the collapse of the financial sector. Then in 2008, this country took a massive leap forward with the election of Barack Obama. Republicans were nowhere to be found, setting the narrative that the party was damaged beyond repair. In 2009, the Tea Party came into formation, planting the seeds for what we now realize was the rebirth of the latest populism movement. 

e millennials have grown up with the storylines surrounding the dot-

com bubble, 9/11, the introduction of the smartphone and the collapse of the financial sector. Then in 2008, this country took a massive leap forward with the election of Barack Obama. Republicans were nowhere to be found, setting the narrative that the party was damaged beyond repair. In 2009, the Tea Party came into formation, planting the seeds for what we now realize was the rebirth of the latest populism movement.

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